Welcome!  blue-ginger has become a showcase for many talented local artists and craftspeople as well as some of the best of British talent and carefully sourced fairly traded crafts from far away.   The gallery, located in the grounds of a C15th timber framed Herefordshire farmhouse, has a diversity of quality goods on display. Within the main gallery there is also a coffee shop serving light lunches, delicious homemade cakes, and fair-trade tea and coffee.

 

In addition to the wide ranging and versatile selection of art and craft in the main gallery, you’ll also find handmade contemporary silver jewellery by Carol of Silverfish Designs in the Little Studio, mi-frame picture framing and limited edition prints and images, and The Summer House offers a showcase for a wide range of local artists and craftspeople to demonstrate and display their work. Throughout the year there are special exhibitions, suppers and events at the gallery.

 

Hopefully you will enjoy a flavour of blue-ginger as you explore the web site, and that you will be able to visit the gallery yourself and enjoy the friendly, welcoming atmosphere and perhaps taste our delicious homemade savoury muffins!.

 


 

JEWELLER OF THE MONTH

SUSAN WILKINSON

My pieces are designed to be tactile; they are meant to be fiddled with. I don’t often look in a mirror and see what I am wearing around my neck, but I do know how my necklace feels when I rub my thumbnail over the surface. Most of my design ideas come to me when I am in the garden, surrounded by plants, by rocks (collected by my husband, a geologist), and shells.
Rather than try to replicate anything I have around me it is the combination of random patterns and organic textures that I appreciate and try to realise in my work. I use various techniques to achieve this; milling, reticulation, even hammering the silver against stone, and the effects are different each time. Surfaces are left matte, and I prefer to use semiprecious stones that are left unpolished, in order to better show their structure.

 


 

FEATURED ARTISTS

May 10 - July 2 2017

OUT OF THE QUIET PLACES

Three artists explore nature in print, paint and glass - with Annabelle Oppenheimer, Pippa Meddings and Rowan McOnegal. The images are created using different processes though all worked in layers, using expressive lines, marks, texture and colour.

 

You can meet the artists at the gallery on May 20 10:00am - 4:00pm

   

ANNABELLE OPPENHEIMER

I make intaglio (etching, drypint and collagraph) and relief prints (lino and woodcut) which I develop from drawings, paintings and different ideas, collections and notes in my sketchbooks. My subject matter is almost always natural form, be it landscape, trees or plant life. The steps involved in printmaking make it a very absorbing process with that time between idea and outcome holding ongoing surprises. Sometimes I make a print from more than one plate, for example combining collagraph and drypoint.'

PIPPA MEDDINGS

Working experimentally in acrylics and watercolours, I try to capture the spirit of a plant through translucent glazes, loose expressive strokes and drawing back into the surface I have created to introduce detail. Some paintings also include still life elements: vintage vases and hints of treasured textiles, inviting the viewer to look more closely.

ROWAN MCONEGAL

I currently work with glass and paint, and work into the surface with sandblasting after cutting and /or painting a resist onto 'flashed' glass. I have been studying building up paint in layers using different mediums such as oils and vinegar, and also plating layers of glass together - it is always a sensuous process, with the most exciting and creative results being those you didn't expect! I enjoy the complexity and intrigue of overlapping layers of marks creating the story of the materials, and the subtle and poetic metaphors they create, as images become more, or less, visible. This latest work is informed by a recent study trip to Japan, and I was thinking of the layers used in traditional Japanese woodblock printing, which I hope to explore much more in the future.